dental

Keep Waking Up With Headaches?

 

If the first thing you feel in the morning is a headache or pain behind your eyes or pain in your neck and shoulders, come in for a visit. What you’re experiencing could be the result of problems in your mouth. These are common symptoms of a condition known as temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJ), which basically means that your jaws don’t align properly. This misalignment stresses the jaw joints, putting pressure on nerves and muscles – which can result in morning headaches, migraines or facial and neck pain.
Not everyone with TMJ disorder shows symptoms. And not everyone has headaches or pain; TMJ disorder can also lead to broken teeth or fillings, loose teeth and toothaches. What is certain is that if you do display any of these symptoms, they won’t get better without professional help.
Many people find that resting the jaw helps ease the pain. You can do this by eating soft foods, avoiding chewing gum and hard candies. We can also show you jaw exercises to stretch the jaw joints and relieve stress. For most people, the most effective treatment is a custom dental splint that fits over your upper and lower teeth. This reduces the damage done from repeated clenching of the jaw or teeth grinding.
If these conservative methods don’t work, you still have other options. The temporomandibular joints can be flushed out, or an injection of cortisone can help relieve inflammation and pain. Worse-case scenario, you might need surgery. Come in for a visit and we’ll help you find the right solution.

I Lost my Dental Insurance!

Occasionally we get a call from a patient who wants to cancel their cleaning appointment because they have lost their dental insurance. If you have been a regular patient and your teeth are in good shape, the worst thing you can do is try to save money by avoiding preventive care.

If you do not have dental insurance, we offer the convenient option of getting your own Smile Solutions Dental Plan.  We accept most insurance plans. If you don’t have insurance, you can get an individual plan through us.

Preventive maintenance can keep your mouth healthy for less than the premium costs of a decent dental insurance plan. Too often when we have insurance coverage we don’t even know how much our treatment really costs.

I don’t think any of us would neglect the regular maintenance of our car considering the cost of an oil change vs. a new engine. The same is true (but thankfully on a much less expensive scale) for our teeth.  By letting our office check for cavities regularly, most problems can be found while they are small and relatively inexpensive to cure. We can catch a small cavity before it becomes a root canal, a cracked filling before it needs a crown or gum disease before it results in extractions and dentures.

If you do need more extensive treatment we can work with you to design a course of treatment to bring your mouth back to good oral health. There are usually several ways to restore your mouth to better health – each with its own unique cost and time frame.  We can discuss the options, organize your treatment in order of necessity and make financial arrangements to suit your budget.

Let us help you achieve a healthy, beautiful smile and don’t let your insurance dictate your dental care.

Is Oral Piercings Safe?

Oral piercing is a form of body art and self-expression that’s all the rage among teenagers and young adults. While piercings of the tongue, lip or cheek might seem safe because “everyone has them,” that’s not entirely true. The mouth is a moist place, which means it’s a breeding ground for bacteria and infection. And the primary danger of oral piercing is increased risk of infection. There are other risks, too. Oral piercings can also chip or crack teeth, cause nerve damage and produce an allergic reaction to metal. Some people also notice that it’s more difficult to speak, chew and swallow after piercings.
Do the smart thing and have your teenager see a dentist before piercing. Learning about the potential risks will make for a happier, healthier loved one.
And if your teen decides to go ahead with a piercing, make sure he or she keeps it clean! This is the single most effective way to fight off infection. And if your teen notices any of the following symptoms, schedule a dentist appointment right away:
·        Pain, soreness or swelling
·        Chipped or cracked teeth
·        Damage to fillings
·        Sensitivity to metals
·        Numbness

Snoring: Can you do Anything about it?

Snoring is a widespread problem, affecting 30-45% of the population. When you take into account those that are disturbed by it, spouses and children, that number will double. It can have social consequences, disrupting marriages and roommate relationships. Snoring can also have medical consequences, preventing “a good night’s sleep” so individuals wake up fatigued, or more seriously, as a byproduct of obstructive sleep apnea, wherein the snorer momentarily stops breathing during sleep. To objectively identify the problem, an overnight sleep study [polysomnogram] needs to be administered by a medical doctor. The sound of snoring results from the uvula [tissue hanging from roof of soft palate] and the back of the soft palate vibrating. It is caused by a narrowing of the air passages in the throat due to a variety of factors – long uvula or soft palate, large tonsils, excess fat deposits, blocked nasal passages from cold or allergies and/or the relaxation [collapse] of the musculature of the throat and mouth during sleep. Presently, there are several methods that are reasonably predictable and will offer snorers relief. The most common utilizes a device called CPAP [continuous positive air pressure]. A stream of air is pushed through a tube connected to a mask that covers the nose. The continuous air pressure forces the airway to stay open during sleep. There are a large variety of dental appliances, similar to a mouthguard or orthodontic retainer, which are worn while sleeping. Some reposition the lower jaw [mandible] forward while others retain the tongue in a forward position. Essentially, they maintain an open, unobstructed airway in the throat. These appliances may be contraindicated in bruxers [people who grind their teeth]. Why suffer any longer? Any of these treatments can reduce or stop snoring. Call our office for more information.

The Headache Question

Chronic symptoms of the head and neck can often be attributed to:

 Headache — the temporalis muscle (it closes and clenches the jaw)

 Sinus pressure and pain — the lateral pterygoid muscles (it moves the jaw side to side and/or forward)

 Neck stiffness and pain — trapezius muscle (it stabilizes the skull during jaw clenching and grinding)

Dental offices have treated and helped more and more people with their headache problems. For years, we assigned all of these names to headaches, like muscle tension headaches, neuralgia, migraine and so on, and it seems that many headache patients share one very common trait- They clench or grind their teeth at night!

Most medical research has shown that headaches, even people with classical migraine headaches, have no physical reason, no vascular problems and no neurological problems; in fact their physician’s exam will give no physical reason for the pain. Many patients have had CAT scans and MRI’s that were negative, and find that drugs really don’t help their problem; instead the medication makes them groggy and “drugged out.”

What we have discovered is that people who can control their nighttime clenching and grinding will get tremendous relief for their headaches and neck aches. Many people do so much unconscious clenching of their jaw muscles that when they wake up, their teeth are sore, their muscles are already tired, and they are set up for the beginning of a headache from the start of the day, if they don’t wake up with one.

One effective treatment utilizes an NTI appliance (short for nocioceptive trigeminal inhibition), a dental device that fits between the upper and lower front teeth. (Detailed information can be gotten from the website at http://www.headacheprevention.com/ ) The simple fact is that this device reduces the intensity of nighttime parafunction by 70 percent immediately, which can explain why so many patients wake up feeling better very quickly.

A traditional dental mouthpiece, or splint, reduces the resistance to side-to-side movement, thereby, reducing the effort and resultant strain to the jaw joint and sinuses (so long as clenching intensity isn’t too intense). However, the same splint also provides an ideal clenching surface, where maximum clenching intensity may increase and/or allow jaw joint problems to perpetuate.

Many patients run the gamut of the medical world’s attempts to control their headaches- with multiple drugs, injections and so on, without ever thinking that the pain might be muscular in origin. But just like back pain is often muscle spasm, the pain we call TMJ, as well as headaches of many sorts are very much caused by overuse of the muscles of closing the jaws.

We would recommend that if you or a loved one has chronic headache problems, that you go to the web site, or give us a call and let us take a look. It can do no harm, and it might very well make a huge difference in 

A Crowning Achievement

When too much tooth structure has been lost due to decay or fracture, the best treatment choice to restore the tooth to normal function and cosmetic appearance is often the fabrication of a crown [cap]. Crowns are usually made of porcelain fused to metal or all-ceramic depending on the situation and judgment of the dentist. The restoration of the damaged tooth becomes more of an esthetic concern if it is located near the front of one’s mouth. How we perceive our smile and appearance affects our self-esteem, our moods and how we function in social and business relationships. So, when this situation occurs, there is a sense of urgency.

The tooth is prepared to allow enough room for the crown to fit over the tooth without extending too far and interfering with the person’s occlusion [bite]. This procedure usually takes 2 visits, depending on the situation. A provisional acrylic crown is made and temporarily cemented over the tooth. In the second visit, the crown is “tried in” to see how accurately it fits and to check that the ceramic color chosen matches the surrounding teeth. If both the patient and dentist are satisfied, the crown is permanently cemented or bonded to the tooth. Call our office if you think you’re a candidate for this type of procedure.