Author: Dr. Chea Rainford

The Right Age To Consider Orthodontics

The American Association of Orthodontics recommends that a child first be seen by an orthodontist as early as age 7 or earlier should a parent or the family dentist discover a problem. The timing of orthodontic treatment is extremely important and greatly affects the treatment result. Since no two patients are alike, there is no absolute, specific age that is best to begin treatment.

Many progressive treatments are now available for patients six to eleven years old that provide significant benefits, especially in jaw irregularities. These treatments may also prevent certain conditions from worsening. Treating children during their growth stages enables us to achieve results that may not be possible when the face and jaw bones have fully developed. This early treatment can simplify or eliminate additional treatment.

Early diagnosis and treatment by an orthodontic specialist can help guide facial growth and tooth eruption, thus preventing more serious problems from developing. Our goal is to reduce treatment time in full braces and to provide the best and most stable results possible.

Potential Benefits of Timely Treatment

 Influence growth of the jaws in a positive manner

 Improve the width of the dental arches

 Reduce the need to extract permanent teeth

 Reduce or eliminate the need for jaw surgery

 Lower the risk of trauma to protruded front teeth

 Correct harmful oral habits

 Simplify and shorten treatment time

 Increase the stability of final treatment results

 Reduce the likelihood of impacted permanent teeth

 Improve speech development

 Improve the position of the first permanent molars

 Guide permanent teeth into more favorable positions

 Improve lip closure

 Preserve or gain space for erupting teeth

 Reduce the potential for damage to the Temporal Mandibular Joint

 Better cooperation before the teenage years

Help! I Broke My Tooth!

Almost every day we get a call from a patient who has broken a tooth, and generally it means that to save the tooth, we have to place a crown or permanent restoration over it to keep it from breaking further. Sometimes the tooth can’t be saved and that is a real bummer!

What causes teeth to break? Well, there are several factors, one of which we see in almost all tooth fractures. The most common contributing factor is Silver amalgam fillings- these fillings have the unique property of enlarging as they age. So, there seems to be some outward pressure on the tooth and if someone bites just the right (or wrong) way, you hear that crack!

Now this tooth broke in several planes at once, and had to be removed; there wasn’t enough sound tooth structure to save it! So an implant or bridge needed to be done.

This is a more common sort of fracture. The inside aspect of the tooth just shears away. Luckily, this tooth can be saved with a crown, after first making sure there is no decay present.

The second common factor is bruxism- the habit of grinding or clenching the teeth. Many bruxers break teeth that don’t even have fillings in them, but they always have a higher percentage of broken teeth than people who don’t brux or clench.

If you or someone you know does grind their teeth and are worried about a tooth or some teeth, don’t hesitate to give us a call and we will be glad to check it out for you! Don’t wait until it hurts!

Child’s First Visit To The Dentist

We would like to see your child as soon as the first tooth erupts (around six months of age). The most important goals of this first visit are to introduce your child to the office surroundings and to develop a trust in the dentist and our staff. We view this visit as an icebreaker. If your child is too frightened, uncomfortable or uncooperative, we may have to re-schedule several short visits. You will be charged a reasonable fee for the time. Please do not try to explain the first visit yourself. Do not use phrases like “Be brave!” or “Don’t be afraid”. Don’t offer them a bribe with special treats to get them to the office. Rather be positive and reassuring that the visit will be fun and one in which to look forward.

The appointment should be 15-30 minutes and may include necessary x-rays, a gentle, comprehensive examination of the teeth, gums, jaws, bite and oral tissues. This is both to observe any problems and to establish a baseline so we can monitor your child’s growth and development. Depending on your child’s age and cooperation, we may also clean and polish their teeth and apply a topical fluoride. Please bring to this first appointment any of your child’s medical records. We will try to discuss and answer any questions you may have at that time. Our objective is to be gentle and patient so your child develops a positive attitude towards the dental office and their own oral he

Gums Don’t Discriminate

 Gum disease might seem like something only adults suffer from but it affects people of all ages. So, while teens may feel – and often appear to be – indestructible, their gums tell a different tale.

TeenHealth.com reports that 60 percent of 15-year-olds already have gingivitis, the early stage of gum disease. Even more sobering, other studies show that teenage girls may be at higher risk of gum disease due to their hormonal changes.

This is bad news for teenagers, who may have bad breath or sore gums as the result of gingivitis. But there’s also good news: gum disease can easily be treated and prevented.

Treatment of gingivitis usually involves a scaling and root planing treatment (SRP) – also known as “deep cleaning” – to remove plaque and tartar buildup below the gum line. Just one SRP treatment can reverse the signs of gingivitis and prevent gum disease from progressing.

After SRP treatment, prevent gingivitis from returning by: brushing at least twice daily, flossing at least once daily, getting dental cleanings twice a year AND eating healthy foods. The last one might be the biggest challenge since eating tooth-and-gum-friendly foods trip most teens up; sweets, sodas, energy drinks and sports drinks are all heavily marketed to and largely consumed by teenagers.

You can make it easier for your teen to choose healthy options for their teeth and body by ensuring the refrigerator is always stocked with things like fresh fruit, vegetables, cheese and water.

If your teen suffers from gingivitis, or you’re concerned about his or her oral healthcare habits, give us a call for an appointment. We’re definitely here for you and serve as an essential barrier against gum disease.

A Beautiful Smile Is Precious And Priceless

 Did you know that the shape, shade, length and spacing of your teeth could significantly affect your smile? And our smiles can greatly affect our self-esteem and confidence?

Common conditions that impact your smile negatively include:
• Broken, cracked or worn teeth
• Discolored teeth
• Missing teeth
• Crooked teeth
• Decayed teeth
• Gaps between teeth
• “Gummy smiles”
The good news is that, thanks to modern technology and improved materials, these physical issues can be dramatically changed to create natural, long-lasting and beautiful smiles.
Each patient, along with his/her unique circumstances, must be evaluated individually. Factors such as occlusion [bite], oral habits, available space, health of the gum tissue, severity of the problem and patient expectations must be taken into consideration during the makeover planning process.
Depending on the situation, there are a variety of treatment options to achieve excellent esthetic outcomes. For whiter natural teeth, in-office or at-home bleaching [whitening] techniques are available. Repairing teeth or closing spaces may be accomplished with tooth-colored composite resin bonding, porcelain veneers or porcelain crowns.
These procedures vary in time and cost along with differences in longevity and appearance. If you’re not satisfied with your smile, or you want to learn if you’re a good candidate for any of these remarkable techniques, call our office today for a consultation.

What is a Mouthguard?

A mouthguard is a flexible appliance that is worn in athletic and recreational activities to protect teeth from trauma. The dental profession unanimously supports the use of mouthguards in a variety of sports activities.
Why should I wear a mouthguard?
A mouthguard can prevent serious injuries such as broken teeth, jaw fractures, cerebral hemorrhage and neck injuries by helping to avoid situations where the lower jaw gets jammed into the upper jaw. Mouthguards are effective in moving soft tissue in the oral cavity away from the teeth, preventing laceration and bruising of the lips and cheeks, especially for those who wear orthodontic appliances. They may also reduce the severity and incidence of concussions.
In what sports should I wear a mouthguard?
Anytime there is a strong chance for contact with other participants or hard surfaces, it is advisable to wear a mouthguard. Players who participate in basketball, softball, football, wrestling, soccer, lacrosse, rugby, in-line skating and martial arts, as well as recreational sports such as skateboarding and bicycling, should wear mouthguards while competing.
Why don’t kids wear mouthguards?
Parents are sometimes uninformed about the level of contact and potential for serious dental injuries involved with sports in which the child participates. Some, though not all, schools reinforce the health advantage of mouthguards for their contact sports. Cost may be another consideration, although mouthguards come in a variety of price ranges.
What are the different types of mouthguards?
Stock mouthguard: The lowest cost option is a ready-made, stock item, which offers the least protection because the fit adjustment is limited. It may interfere with speech and breathing because this mouthguard requires that the jaw be closed to hold it in place. A stock mouthguard is not considered acceptable as a facial protective device.
Mouth-formed mouthguard: There are two types of mouth-formed mouthguards. The first is a shell-liner mouthguard that is made with an acrylic material that is poured into an outer shell, where it forms a lining. When placed in an athlete’s mouth, the protector’s lining material molds to the teeth and is allowed to set. Another type is a thermoplastic, or “boil-and-bite,” mouthguard. This mouthguard is softened in hot water and then placed in the mouth and shaped around the teeth by using finger, tongue and sometimes biting pressure.
Custom-made mouthguard: The best choice is a mouthguard custom-made by your dentist. It offers the best protection, fit and comfort level because it is made from a cast to fit your teeth.
 
How should I care for a mouthguard?
  • Clean your mouthguard by washing it with soap and cool (not hot) water.
  • Before storing, soak your mouthguard in mouthwash.
  • Keep your mouthguard in a well-ventilated, plastic storage box when not in use. Make sure the box has several holes so the mouthguard will dry.
  • Heat is bad for a mouthguard, so don’t leave it in direct sunlight or in a closed automobile.
  • Don’t bend your mouthguard when storing.
  • Don’t handle or wear someone else’s mouthguard.
  • Call your dentist if there are any problems.

Root Canals: Planting A Lasting Image

For a severely infected tooth, there are often only two treatment options: root canal therapy or tooth removal. In most cases, a root canal is the preferable choice, because it’s the only way to save a tooth. Extractions are the treatment of last resort.
A root canal consists of the dentist making a small hole in the tooth and then removing the tiny nerves and blood vessels within the root(s). The roots are then shaped, disinfected and filled with an inert material.
While root canals are the most feared of all dental procedures – largely due to lingering stories of outdated treatment methods, which paint the wrong picture – today this procedure can be performed with minimal discomfort. Furthermore, the success rate is quite high; 90% of patients experience no further complications after the procedure.
In the rare instances where a root canal fails, there are still options available. In many cases, the root canal can be performed again. If this isn’t possible, a procedure called an apicoectomy can be performed. An apicoectomy involves the removal of the root’s tip and then placing a filling over the severed root tip. If these measures fail, the tooth may have to be removed.
However, please remember that modern root canal therapy is both safe and overwhelmingly effective. Plus new techniques continue to build upon the already high success rate.
Call our office today if you experience severe tooth pain. We will examine your tooth and advise on the most appropriate course of treatment.

We’re Here to Pump You Up

 

Can working out improve your dental health? According to one study at the Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine, the findings were conclusive: Yes!

The researchers took the same factors that lower the risk of diabetes and heart disease into account when analyzing data from 12,110 participants. They found that those who exercised regularly, had healthy eating habits and maintained their weight were 40 percent less likely to develop periodontal disease than their counterparts.

The study, published in the Journal of Periodontology, even shows that those who met two of the three criteria lowered their risk by 29 percent, while participants with just one healthy virtue had a 16 percent less chance of developing gum disease.

Overall, only seven percent of those who met all three of the criteria had some form of gum disease. The participants who had a poor diet, limited physical activity and were considered overweight totaled 18 percent, suggesting that obesity can more than double the risk of periodontal disease.

Scientists aren’t exactly sure why these factors may decrease your chances of developing gum disease. It’s already known that healthy eating helps build up the immune system. However, scientists now theorize that eating healthy foods, such as fruits and vegetables, may also help remove dental plaque from teeth. It’s also believed that obesity promotes gum inflammation, while physical activity may decrease it.

While a healthy lifestyle may help improve your dental health, it’s not a substitute for maintaining a good oral hygiene routine. Brushing and flossing daily and seeing your dentist twice a year are essential.

Give us a call today to make your next appointment. Your teeth and gums will thank us.

Happy New Dental Year!

Happy New Dental Year!
Lets make this New Year a good dental health year!
Keep up with your regular dental visits and good dental home habits.  Our office looks forward to providing excellent Dental Health Care for you and your family for all!

Making Dental Visits Easy for Kids

With your help, dental visits can be a positive – even fun – experience for your kids. Our staff will spend a lot of time with your kids to help them feel comfortable and understand what they can expect. You can help us make their next visit a successful one by working with us to accomplish this goal!
Here’s what we suggest:
·        Use only positive words when answering your kids’ questions. Soft, easy, fun and play are good words to use.
·        Avoid using words like pain, hurt, needle and shot. These words make kids (and many adults) scared and anxious.
·        After treatment is completed, you can help continue the positive experience by praising your child and referring to the fun time they just had.
·        DON’T ask negative questions like: Did it hurt? Were you scared? Did you get a shot? These comments could make your child think that there was a reason to be afraid even though they were cooperative and had a good time. It might also make them afraid of future visits.
If your child receives any kind of anesthesia, assure them that their “tickly” or “sleepy” tongue will go away in no time. Most kids don’t mind the numbness, and some even think it’s fun – that’s a good thing.