braces

X-rays: Yes or NO?

While we share your concerns about potential risks from too much exposure to radiation, x-rays [radiographs] are a necessary part of the dental health process.

Our philosophy is that x-rays should not be routine but utilized when they will contribute to diagnosis or treatment of oral disease. Of course, we will cover you with appropriate body shielding prior to taking any x-rays.

Radiographs allow us to see and interpret signs of disease or potential problems that are not visible through direct observation. X-rays can be used to discover abscesses [pus-pocket], cysts, and/or tumors. They help us locate impacted, unerupted or extra teeth or determine congenitally missing teeth. Radiographs can demonstrate the presence or degree of periodontal [gum] disease. They can pinpoint the location and severity of cavities that are not visible to the naked eye. Basically, radiographs provide us with a view of the underlying structure and condition of your teeth, soft tissue and bone. Foregoing x-rays could result in an inaccurate diagnosis or incomplete treatment.

Usually, new adult patients will be given a full series of x-rays that will serve as a frame of reference for future changes or problems. The time frame between [6-18 months], type and number of follow-up x-rays will be determined by our assessment of your individual needs and the condition of your mouth. Growth and development are additional factors taken into account with young children. Certain situations such as root canal treatment necessitate several x-rays as part of the procedure. Patient with periodontal disease or implants will require radiographs at specific intervals to monitor their condition. As we are sensitive to your concerns, our office continues to keep abreast of ongoing radiological advances, and we utilize techniques and x-ray films that will minimize your exposure and maximize your excellent oral health.

Let your smile do the talking

You never get a second chance to make a first impression, and a brilliant smile can make a big impact. Come see us for a total smile makeover and you’ll send the right message with every single flash of your pearly whites.
Did you know that new advances in cosmetic dentistry mean you can perfect your smile in just a few appointments? Our practice offers veneers, bonding and long-lasting whitening — we can even straighten crowded teeth and close gaps in no time at all!
You deserve to look and feel your best. Call us today and let our team give you a smile that says it all.
Call 678 810 1100

Why So Sensitive? 5 Reasons Why Your Teeth Hurt

Do your teeth hurt when you drink or eat something hot or cold? Most people think this is normal, but that’s not always the case. When your teeth hurt, they’re trying to tell you something: See your dentist.

More often than not, tooth sensitivity is a sign of a dental problem like tooth decay or gum disease. But there are other reasons why your teeth may be hurting:

  • You might have a cracked or broken tooth
  • One of your fillings could be broken or rotten
  • You might be grinding your teeth while you sleep
  • You could be brushing your teeth too hard
  • There might be dental plaque buildup on your tooth roots

Don’t make the mistake of ignoring sensitive teeth or trying to self-treat. If your sensitivity lasts longer than a couple of days or keeps recurring over a couple of weeks, make an appointment to see your dentist. The longer you wait, the worse it can get and the more expensive treatment will be. A quick exam can reveal exactly what’s going on and get you back to living pain-free.

Dental Care Checklist for Adults

Don’t let dental visits slide! Adult life can sometimes be a juggling act and it may feel like you just can’t find the time for a dental visit. But making time for regular dental visits now can help keep you out of the dental office in the future.

Brush and floss daily, even if it’s late. You’ve heard this a million times by now, but the importance of regular brushing and flossing can never be emphasized enough. Even if you’ve been good about your oral hygiene all your life, resist the temptation to let it slide for even one day; the longer plaque stays on your teeth, the more destructive it becomes.

Eat well-balanced meals. When you’re juggling work, home and kids, it can be tempting to turn to fast food, soda and sugary snacks as a way to save time and feel more energetic. But sugar is a tooth decay demon and can cause you to crash after that initial “sugar high.” Be sure to integrate plenty of fresh vegetables into your daily meals and eat fruit, nuts and celery or carrot sticks as snacks.

Exercise regularly — it’s good for your teeth! Studies show that people who maintain a healthy lifestyle — exercise and eating right — are 40 percent less likely to develop advanced gum disease.

Consider treating yourself to cosmetic dentistry. Whether you want a quick boost or a complete smile makeover, there are plenty of cosmetic dental treatments available to help you achieve your dream smile. One-hour laser teeth whitening treatments can make your teeth 8-10 shades whiter, and porcelain veneers can mask stained teeth, chipped teeth or crooked teeth.

What Is Cementum?

What Is Cementum?

Cementum is a hard layer of tissue that helps the periodontal ligament attach firmly to a tooth. Made of cementoblasts, cementum slowly forms over a lifetime.

Cementum is a hard, calcified layer of tissue that covers the root of the tooth. On its outer side, cementum is attached to the periodontal ligament; on its inner side, the dentin. Along with the periodontal ligament, alveolar bone and gingiva, cementum helps a tooth stay in its place. In fact, if it weren’t for cementum, the periodontal ligament wouldn’t be able to attach firmly to a tooth.

Slowly formed throughout life, cementum is created when the root of the tooth excretes cementoblasts. Though cementoblasts are somewhat of a mystery, it is known that cementum is yellow in color and softer than dentin. Its chemical makeup is similar to that of bone — but unlike bone, cementum is avascular (not supported by blood vessels).

Types of Cementum

There are three types of cementum: acellular cementum, cellular cementum and afibrillar cementum. Acellular cementum covers about 1/3-1/2 of the root and has little to no cellular components. Cellular cementum covers about 1/3-1/2 of the apex and is permeable. Afibrillar cementum sometimes extends onto the enamel of the tooth.

If you have periodontal disease, your acellular cementum, cellular cementum or afibrillar cementum may also be diseased. A gum disease treatment called scaling and root planing can be performed to remove the diseased cementum, as well as dental tartar and diseased dentin.

If it has been awhile since your last dental visit, make an appointment today.

What Can I Eat If I Am Wearing Braces?

The following substances will cause damage to the braces and should absolutely not be eaten: candy apples, caramels, hard and sticky candy, candy bars, aquarium gravel, gum balls, jaw breakers, chicklets, or other gum, popcorn, bones, nuts, ice, chips, chewable vitamins, or any other crunchy or sticky items.

Foods such as apples, carrots, celery, pretzels, French bread, bagels, waffles, and meats should be cut into small pieces and chewed with your back teeth. Keep pencils, fingernails, straws, etc. out of your mouth. Please realize that the use of sugar-containing candy, soda, gum, etc. also promotes tooth decay.

If a bracket falls off, the wire bends or anything else breaks or becomes loose, the patient needs to call right away so that an appointment may be made for the appropriate length of time (generally 30-45 minutes) that we need in order to make the repair. This is especially important even if the patient already has an appointment scheduled.

We know that loose bands, poking wires and other problems can occur with even the most careful and cooperative patients and we will work with you to accommodate your needs in every way we can.

The Right Age To Consider Orthodontics

The American Association of Orthodontics recommends that a child first be seen by an orthodontist as early as age 7 or earlier should a parent or the family dentist discover a problem. The timing of orthodontic treatment is extremely important and greatly affects the treatment result. Since no two patients are alike, there is no absolute, specific age that is best to begin treatment.

Many progressive treatments are now available for patients six to eleven years old that provide significant benefits, especially in jaw irregularities. These treatments may also prevent certain conditions from worsening. Treating children during their growth stages enables us to achieve results that may not be possible when the face and jaw bones have fully developed. This early treatment can simplify or eliminate additional treatment.

Early diagnosis and treatment by an orthodontic specialist can help guide facial growth and tooth eruption, thus preventing more serious problems from developing. Our goal is to reduce treatment time in full braces and to provide the best and most stable results possible.

Potential Benefits of Timely Treatment

 Influence growth of the jaws in a positive manner

 Improve the width of the dental arches

 Reduce the need to extract permanent teeth

 Reduce or eliminate the need for jaw surgery

 Lower the risk of trauma to protruded front teeth

 Correct harmful oral habits

 Simplify and shorten treatment time

 Increase the stability of final treatment results

 Reduce the likelihood of impacted permanent teeth

 Improve speech development

 Improve the position of the first permanent molars

 Guide permanent teeth into more favorable positions

 Improve lip closure

 Preserve or gain space for erupting teeth

 Reduce the potential for damage to the Temporal Mandibular Joint

 Better cooperation before the teenage years